STEM Projects Factor Into Race to the Top Winners

by Allacyn - Sep 14, 2010


I read an article today by Erick W. Robelen called “Race to Top Winners Embed STEM Projects in Plans” in Education Week and also looked up some information about this program on the U.S. Department of Education website ed.gov, here are some of the things I found very interesting.

Many educators are waiting to hear wether  a third phase in the federal Race to the Top competition will be approved for an additional $1.35 billion, over $4 billion in federal funding has already been awarded to 11 states and the District of Columbia. 

Phase 2 winners were announced recently and this phase of the competition was pretty tough with many states scoring within a few points of each other. One of the distinguishing factors was the presence of STEM Projects embedded throughout states plans for reform. STEM- science, technology, engineering, and mathematics – education was a priority factor  when making the decisions of which states would be awarded the funds. There was a total of 500 points possible for applications and STEM plans could earn states 15 points if they addressed all three of the following areas throughout their applications;

  • Offer a rigorous course of study in the STEM fields;
  • Cooperate with industry experts, research centers, community partners, and others to “prepare and assist teachers in integrating STEM content across grades and disciplines, in promoting effective and relevant instruction, and in offering applied learning opportunities for students”; and
  • Prepare more students for advanced study and careers in STEM, including by addressing the needs of traditionally underrepresented groups in those fields.

The states all came up with different ideas on how to incorporate STEM education into their schools and according to the U.S. Department of Education website ed.gov they plan on bringing all of the states together to implement reforms. To read all of the states applications, Peer Reviewers Comments, and scores visit the U.S. Department of Education website.

To read Erik W. Robelen’s full article in Education Week click here.



Share |



Filed under: Insights

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.